3 Strategies to Fix Your Living Space 

I learned to decorate like everyone else, by putting in time and effort, pushing past my limits, and practicing in my own space.

I don’t want to come across too serious.  But consider this for a moment: we make better decisions when we are well informed.

We see clarity in the next step we take with our new knowledge.

Our knowledge will help us filter and determine what to discard and highlight in our space.

I wrote a post about how to decorate a home on a budget without spending a single penny.

We haven’t mastered everything yet. Mastering theory and practice, on the other hand, will enrich our journey.

We won’t be able to create personalized rooms overnight.

These three practical principles will help you save space and will serve as a starting point for this journey.

1. Develop Your Decorator’s Eyes (See A Room As A Decorator)

There’s no need to worry about it.We should reject the notion that most people are born with abilities and talents.

Instead, we should embrace the fact that we can learn extraordinary skills and then turn them into our talent.

Any skill can be learned by anyone. It all comes down to practise and exposure.

Looking at spaces helps us develop our inner decorator’s eye. Yes, you read that correctly. It will be a trial-and-error approach.

This concept should be viewed in the same way that we view skills we use every day, such as swimming, biking, or driving.

We improve these skills with practice. When we master something, we no longer have to think about it; it becomes second nature.

We don’t participate in these activities because we want to participate in a competitive sport (sometimes just to feed our ego).

We learn these skills simply because they are useful, and we end up using them in our daily lives. Swimming becomes a pastime, and driving becomes a mode of transportation.

Similarly, we can learn to see our surroundings with new eyes. Decorating is a skill that can be learned through practice.

We can later use this ability to claim our own space. Believe in the journey. Everything is a process.

We need to think of clever ways to train our eyes to see the space through the eyes of decorators and stylists.

Consider repetition. It’s similar to establishing a routine with an end goal in mind.

The more you look at spaces and identify the elements that make a space work, the better.

The easier it is to pinpoint what we want to highlight in our room and identify what we need to remove or add to transform it.

Limit your vision by viewing a space in the same way you would view  a photograph

Consider a favourite photograph. How is it organized?

There is something about the composition that draws you to the image. Photographers always use the rule of thirds to take their shots.

The rule of thirds requires the photographer to examine the entire shot and capture three segments within the horizontal and vertical lines.

They place the photographed object in a grid where these lines intersect. When done correctly, it draws the viewer’s attention.

In the same way, we can apply the same concept to the space to determine if it is balanced and harmonious.

This concept assists us in visualizing how we can position items in a room to achieve the desired balance.

Take note of the space you see and learn from it.

Examine your surroundings. Is the room evoking the desired emotion? What kind of atmosphere do you want to create in this room? Are you able to recognize the styles?

Immerse yourself in what you see.

Examine other rooms to see what works and how the furniture is arranged. How many different colours can you name? What effect does the colour have on the space? Is there a sense of surprise in the room?

What do you like best about the room? Will removing an item from the room leave it feeling unfinished? What works in the space? How do you feel as you look around the room?

Simply practice by staring at images. Consider why something catches your eye.

2. Create a focal point

A focal point is the room’s main attraction.

Consider your surroundings as if you were looking at a painting. A good image is one that tells a story. The image causes us to pause and focus our attention (eyes) on a single element.

In the same way, a room should make us feel the same way. A focal point creates a sense of order and fools the eyes into seeing a well-kept room. Not everything in a room should compete for our attention.

Think, what is the first thing we notice when we enter the room? What is the first thing you want your space to highlight, if we could rephrase the question? We can direct the eye in the space.

We direct the gaze in the room in two ways:

By introducing Symmetry 

It is when a space evenly divided into two sides that mirror each other.

Two chairs on either side of a coffee table, for example, can be said to be symmetrically balanced.

Because design elements are repeated on both sides, this type of balance is simple to achieve.

This type of balance, if not maintained with care, can become monotonous and boring.

Highlight a room natural’s feature

This is demonstrated by an architectural feature in a space. A fireplace, a window with a good view, highlighting a high ceiling with beautiful light, a chandelier, or a statement light fixture of our choice can all be great places to rest our eyes.

Other notable features include exposed bricks, wood beams, built-in shelves, and a staircase.

No architectural focus, create one yourself

When a space lacks a focal point, we can create one with artwork, photos, a gallery, or any type of hanging, such as mirrors.

These aid in the creation of a landing spot for the eyes.

To make a statement, we can add an accent wall or a mural. We can create a dramatic effect by using wallpaper or adding panels.

A simple piece of oversized furniture can also draw attention. Examine your surroundings; is there anything that catches your attention?

It can be difficult to identify this when items are already present in a room. Nothing too fancy. Simply take a picture of your surroundings with your phone.

Take a look at the photos that were taken. Do you notice any architectural features that you would like to highlight? Or do you know of a location where you could create something eye-catching?

If a room has a lot of items on display, we can remove some of them to create an open, cohesive space. Taking a picture of the space you want to decorate is the best way to approach a room.

By introducing Assymetry

It is less ordered than symmetrical balance and can be more complex and interesting.

For example, a sofa can be balanced by placing two chairs on the opposite side.

 

 

Beautiful Living Room

3. Create a mood board for the space

A little effort will not be in vain.

First, determine your personal style. It is easier to collect visual images for the space you want to create when you know your style.

Your image collections are dictated by your understanding of what you want.

The mood board concept can be divided into four categories: plan it, create it, experience it, and translate the findings in your space.

Make a plan and clear the clutter

We’ll use an elimination procedure. Make a list of the items you will keep and those you will discard.

Donate or sell items you no longer require. The space will feel more open and functional.

When you get rid of things you no longer use, the room will breathe.

Make a list with three categories: things to keep, things to throw away/donate, and treasures to sell.

Clutter removal in the space reveals the room’s potential.

We all have things in our homes that we know we shouldn’t have, but we haven’t had the courage to get rid of them. Take pictures of your items if you believe you have everything in order and the room is clutter-free. We’ll use the photos we took later.

The captures will be added to the vision board.

Create with emotions and activities

A little effort will not be in vain.

First, determine your personal style. It is easier to collect visual images for the space you want to create when you know your style.

Your image collections are dictated by your understanding of what you want.

The mood board concept can be divided into four categories: plan it, create it, experience it, and translate the findings in your space.

Make a plan and clear the clutter.

We’ll use an elimination procedure. Make a list of the items you will keep and those you will discard.

Donate or sell items you no longer require. The space will feel more open and functional.

When you get rid of things you no longer use, the room will breathe.

Make a list with three categories: things to keep, things to throw away/donate, and treasures to sell.

Clutter removal in the space reveals the room’s potential.

We all have things in our homes that we know we shouldn’t have, but we haven’t had the courage to get rid of them.

Take pictures of your items if you believe you have everything in order and the room is clutter-free. We’ll use the photos we took later.

The captures will be added to the vision board.

pexels-pixabay-271800

Check your closet to see for inspiration

Looking in our closet is the quickest way to determine the colour we want to live with.

What colour do we prefer? Which of these colours is our go-to for outfits? Is there any colour in our closet?

What do we wear that makes us feel good? Do we enjoy dressing up? Do we have a more relaxed look?

Consider how your closet’s outfits make you feel.

Bring this vibe into your space if it is one you enjoy.

Choose a colour that corresponds to the emotion you want the space to convey. To most people, red brings energy into a room, but to others, it can be frustrating.

Choose a colour from your closet that speaks to you and build your look around it. Colours that are warm or cold?

It is entirely up to you. How will you define your personal style? Is it contemporary? Feminine? Masculine? Use these elements in your space.

Furniture with sharp corners is masculine, while furniture with curves is feminine.

Consider materials and textiles

Do you notice anything smooth or rough in the space? How are they implemented? How does it interact with space?

Smooth materials make a room feel more comfortable. Bring in an ambiance by using materials such as metals, stone, and soft or rough textures.

Start collecting images for inspiration to create a mood board to translate that vision collection into your space if you know your style.

A home is what you make of it!

An inspired timeless space does not mean compromising on style.

 It should show who we are what we value, and our taste. let’s learn to create rooms that move, and inspire us.

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